Photography

Ginger Baby Onesies and Tees

by j9pers on December 4, 2009 · 0 comments

Onesies and Tees

After a long search, we have finally found onesies and tees that are worthy of being worn by your Ginger Baby. Made of 100% soft, thick organic cotton, we think you’ll be as impressed with the quality as we are. And all of our designs are printed with eco-friendly, water based inks so you can feel good about what you’re putting on your little one as well as what you’re not putting into the environment.

The “… Was a Ginger Baby Too” Series

Our subjects for this series are based on their merit as artists, leaders or great thinkers.  Some are famous, some are infamous – but all were born with undeniably red hair.

Elizabeth Tee
(Noa is shown in a shoulder tee)
Ginger-Elizabeth-round

Queen Elizabeth I

The reign of Queen Elizabeth I is often referred to as The Golden Age of English history. Elizabeth was an immensely popular Queen, and her popularity has waned little with the passing of four hundred years. She is still one of the best loved monarchs, and one of the most admired rulers of all time.

  • Printed on white organic cotton with eco-friendly inks
  • Sizes: Onesies:    Newborn, 6M, 12M
    Shoulder Tee:    6M, 12M, 18M
    Child’s Tee:  2T, 3T, 4T, 5/6T

US $19.99

Ginger-Winston-round

Winston Churchill

He was the lion who roared when the British Empire needed him most.
Churchill was an effective leader and statesman because of his tremendous ability to inspire people; his unique strategic insight; his relentless passion; and his imperturbable personality.

  • Printed on white organic cotton with eco-friendly inks
  • Sizes: Onesies:    Newborn, 6M, 12M
    Shoulder Tee:    6M, 12M, 18M
    Child’s Tee:  2T, 3T, 4T, 5/6T

US $19.99

Vincent-round

Vincent van Gough

As a post impressionist painter and one of the most famous artists of all time, Vincent van Gogh has become an icon.  Though he lived more than 115 years ago, his artwork is still altering the way mankind views beauty, persona, individuality,and style in art.

  • Printed on white organic cotton with eco-friendly inks
  • Sizes: Onesies:    Newborn, 6M, 12M
    Shoulder Tee:    6M, 12M, 18M
    Child’s Tee:  2T, 3T, 4T, 5/6T

US $19.99

Ginger-Woody-round

Woody Allen

Love him or despise him, Woody Allen is a talented American screenwriter, film director, actor, comedian, writer, musician, and playwright. Allen’s distinctive films, three Academy Awards and 21 nominations have made him one of the most respected living American directors.

  • Printed on white organic cotton with eco-friendly inks
  • Sizes: Onesies:    Newborn, 6M, 12M
    Shoulder Tee:    6M, 12M, 18M
    Child’s Tee:  2T, 3T, 4T, 5/6T

US $19.99

The Original Ginger Baby Onesies and Tees

Ginger-cute
(Jude is shown in a shoulder tee)
Im-a-GB-round

I’m A Ginger Baby

Show your ginger pride! This design is also available on a terrycloth bib.

  • Printed on white organic cotton with eco-friendly inks
  • Sizes: Onesies: Newborn, 6M, 12M
    Shoulder Tee: 6M, 12M, 18M
    Child’s Tee: 2T, 3T, 4T, 5/6T

US $19.99

Ginger-cute-round

Ginger is The New Cute

Green may be the new black, but ginger is definately the new cute.

  • Printed on white organic cotton with eco-friendly inks
  • Sizes: Onesies: Newborn, 6M, 12M
    Shoulder Tee: 6M, 12M, 18M
    Child’s Tee: 2T, 3T, 4T, 5/6T

US $19.99

Ginger-synonyms-round

Ginger Synonyms

What’s another word for ginger? This shirt describes our beloved ginger babies perfectly.

  • Printed on white organic cotton with eco-friendly inks
  • Sizes: Onesies: Newborn, 6M, 12M
    Shoulder Tee: 6M, 12M, 18M
    Child’s Tee: 2T, 3T, 4T, 5/6T

US $19.99

Ginger-definition-round

Ginger Definition

We know here are really no words to describe your ginger baby, but this shirt comes close.

  • Printed on white organic cotton with eco-friendly inks
  • Sizes: Onesies: Newborn, 6M, 12M
    Shoulder Tee: 6M, 12M, 18M
    Child’s Tee: 2T, 3T, 4T, 5/6T

US $19.99

problem

Ginger Defiance

The term for prejudice against those with red hair is “gingerism,” and it’s been in the news a lot lately. Let the anti-gingerites  know that you and your baby aren’t going to be bullied.

  • Printed on white organic cotton with eco-friendly inks
  • Sizes: Onesies: Newborn, 6M, 12M
    Shoulder Tee: 6M, 12M, 18M
    Child’s Tee: 2T, 3T, 4T, 5/6T

US $19.99

For the “Almost Ginger” Babies

Not all babies can be born with ginger hair, but some come pretty close.  Some are the product of a red haired parent, some have ginger siblings and others just look a bit ginger in the sunlight. Whatever the situation, we’ve got a line of onesies and tees just for your baby.

Ginger-blend-Jude
(Jude is shown in a onesie)
Ginger-blend-round

Ginger Blend

No matter the color of your baby’s hair, if one of the parents is a red head, then he’s officially a “ginger blend.”  Let her show off her proud ginger heritage with this cute shirt.

  • Printed on white organic cotton with eco-friendly inks
  • Sizes: Onesies: Newborn, 6M, 12M
    Shoulder Tee: 6M, 12M, 18M
    Child’s Tee: 2T, 3T, 4T, 5/6T

US $19.99

gingersister-round

New Ginger Baby

Here’s one for the siblings.  Let them show off how proud they must be to welcome a new ginger baby into the world.

  • Printed on white organic cotton with eco-friendly inks
  • Shoulder Tee: 18M
    Child’s Tee: 2T, 3T, 4T, 5/6T

US $19.99

gingerbrother-round

New Ginger Baby

Here’s one for the siblings. Let them show off how proud they must be to welcome a new ginger baby into the world.

  • Printed on white organic cotton with eco-friendly inks
  • Shoulder Tee: 18M
    Child’s Tee: 2T, 3T, 4T, 5/6T

US $19.99

Ginger Photography and Blog

by j9pers on August 25, 2009 · 1 comment

I’d like to start by saying that I am not a stalker.

Okay, now that that’s out of the way…

I love photography and have recently renewed my passion for it with the purchase of a freakin’ amazing camera. (It’s a Canon – see its gloriousness here.)

Unfortunately, my new obsession with photography has confused some mothers in the greater Dallas area. Were it not for my business card and a brief explanation of The Ginger Baby given in a sweet, grandmotherly way, I may have been writing this from a Texas jail cell.

What I hope to achieve with this section is not to create Ginger Stalkers, but showcase Gingers photographically.   And you’re invited to join me.  Be creative!  Have a cute Ginger Baby in your son’s playgroup?  Ask politely if you can have a photo to post on our site.  Are you a Ginger?  Send a shot of yourself as a child.  And they don’t have to be pictures of babies … we love Gingers of all ages.

Who knows where things may lead?  I may start having Ginger Baby photography contests … or … I may forget my business cards one day and end up on parole.

Auto Draft

by j9pers on September 30, 2011 · 0 comments

The Original Ginger Baby

by j9pers on April 21, 2010 · 0 comments

The Original Ginger Baby (new)Blame it on this guy. He’s the one who started the Ginger worship. Even though my mom and older brother had beautiful auburn hair, it wasn’t until my first son was born that I really became aware of the fascination that red hair elicits. And like it or not, my son’s gorgeous red hair has become his trademark.

When he was a child, I don’t remember an outing that his hair didn’t get commented on or pointed at or smiled upon. When he was two, his father and I took a trip to Mexico. As we walked down the street, I began noticing the stares, points, whispers and comments. A block later, I picked him up. People were starting to crowd us and it made me very uncomfortable. I managed to hear a word I recognized, “rojo.”
“Oh, Jeez, it’s the hair!” I thought. A few minutes later, a woman reached out and touched his hair. I clutched my son tighter. She smiled and told me in broken English, “Beautiful. Red. Good luck to touch!” On another block, a woman crossed the street to touch his head.

When my son was a few years old, I heard that Princess Di had had a baby boy. Reports were that Prince Charles looked at little Prince Harry and said disappointedly, “Oh. He has ginger hair.” I’ve had no respect for Prince Charles since then. What a loser.
And look at his gorgeous young son now. Yeah… ginger-licious! So what is it with the British looking down on red heads, anyway? They have had great Kings, Queens and Prime Ministers with red hair. Anyone reading this who has some insight on the issue, I’d love to hear it.

But I digress. My ginger son and his wife have recently had their first baby – a boy. This blog has grown from that experience. My daughter-in-law, Gillian, and I would talk about whether his chances were good for being a red head, wouldn’t it be cool to have a shirt that said …, or we’d discuss how I wish I’d had the organic/natural choices she had when I had my baby. His sensitive, freckled skin would have appreciated the products that are out there now.

There aren’t many resources for those of us who have gingers. And sometimes red heads are different. They do usually have paler, more sensitive skin and they do have issues with name calling and feeling “different.”

We truly hope this blog will help you. Or, if nothing else – enlighten and amuse you.

BandJude-newOh, here’s my son now with his own ginger baby. (Well… the Jury’s still out. What hair he has looks red in the sun. We can only hope.)

Nature’s Ginger Babies

by j9pers on February 24, 2010 · 0 comments

As I was sorting through photos I’ve taken over the past year, I started noticing a trend.  Not only do I tend to find red heads great subjects for photos, I tend to take a lot of shots of other gingers.  “Nature’s gingers,” if you will.  Looking at these other forms of gingers, made me wonder:  Is there discrimination against gingers of other species like there is against human gingers in some parts of the world?  Are they looked down upon or thought of as inferior in some way purely based on the color of their hair/fur/plumage?  In an effort to get to the bottom of this question, here is a quick and completely unscientific look at red heads in nature.

Let’s start with the bird world.  Surely, there’s some discrimination against red heads there.

Here’s the Cardinal.

Cardinal

Nope. One of the most beloved birds in North America.  BECAUSE of it’s gorgeous red plumage.

The Woodpecker perhaps?

Red headed woodpecker

They did make a cartoon about this bird.  Woody Woodpecker.  But he was one of the most popular cartoon characters in history. Woody’s even got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

The Redhead duck?

Redhead duck

Nope. There is a brand of highly trusted, top quality sports gear named after this one.  The founders wouldn’t have bet their image on a mascot that was inferior and loathed.

Surely the parrot?

by Stoichiometry

Wait… Isn’t Jimmy Buffett’s entire empire built on his beloved and proud “Parrot Heads?” Aren’t these beautiful Macaws one of the most intelligent and most valuable birds in the world?

Ah, but humans are mammals, so this must be a mammal issue.

This is a Golden Lion Tamarin.

Ginger Snap Photography

(Gosh, I wish this hair color came in a bottle!)  They are originally from Brazil and an endangered species.  According to Wikipedia, there are several conservation programs attempting to save this species.  Hmmm.  Wonder what the ginger-haters think of that?

Another ginger primate is this guy.

Ginger Snap Photography

I’m not sure what breed he is, but frankly – red hair or not – he can do whatever he wants.

The Irish Setter?

Irish Setter

Considered to be one of the most beautiful dogs ever bred (because of his gorgeous GINGER coat, I might add.) Did you see the Disney movie, “Big Red?”  Don’t see any ginger hatred here, do you?

Okay, let’s go to the infamous red fox.

Red Fox

They were hunted and hated, right? Um… but once killed, didn’t women drape themselves in the fox’s beautiful GINGER fur?  So it was because they liked to eat the Lord’s pheasants that they were hated, not because they were red.

There you have the totally unscientific results of my red heads in nature query. My conclusion?  People who hate or discriminate against red headed people simply because of their hair color are insane.

Obviously, more testing is needed before I publish my report in the Journal Scientific.

Nature’s Ginger Babies

by j9pers on February 24, 2010 · 0 comments

As I was sorting through photos I’ve taken over the past year, I started noticing a trend.  Not only do I tend to find red heads great subjects for photos, I tend to take a lot of shots of other gingers.  “Nature’s gingers,” if you will.  Looking at these other forms of gingers, made me wonder:  Is there discrimination against gingers of other species like there is against human gingers in some parts of the world?  Are they looked down upon or thought of as inferior in some way purely based on the color of their hair/fur/plumage?  In an effort to get to the bottom of this question, here is a quick and completely unscientific look at red heads in nature.

Let’s start with the bird world.  Surely, there’s some discrimination against red heads there.

Here’s the Cardinal.

Cardinal

Nope. One of the most beloved birds in North America.  BECAUSE of it’s gorgeous red plumage.

The Woodpecker perhaps?

Red headed woodpecker

They did make a cartoon about this bird.  Woody Woodpecker.  But he was one of the most popular cartoon characters in history. Woody’s even got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

The Redhead duck?

Redhead duck

Nope. There is a brand of highly trusted, top quality sports gear named after this one.  The founders wouldn’t have bet their image on a mascot that was inferior and loathed.

Surely the parrot?

by Stoichiometry

Wait… Isn’t Jimmy Buffett’s entire empire built on his beloved and proud “Parrot Heads?” Aren’t these beautiful Macaws one of the most intelligent and most valuable birds in the world?

Ah, but humans are mammals, so this must be a mammal issue.

This is a Golden Lion Tamarin.

Ginger Snap Photography

(Gosh, I wish this hair color came in a bottle!)  They are originally from Brazil and an endangered species.  According to Wikipedia, there are several conservation programs attempting to save this species.  Hmmm.  Wonder what the ginger-haters think of that?

Another ginger primate is this guy.

Ginger Snap Photography

I’m not sure what breed he is, but frankly – red hair or not – he can do whatever he wants.

The Irish Setter?

Irish Setter

Considered to be one of the most beautiful dogs ever bred (because of his gorgeous GINGER coat, I might add.) Did you see the Disney movie, “Big Red?”  Don’t see any ginger hatred here, do you?

Okay, let’s go to the infamous red fox.

Red Fox

They were hunted and hated, right? Um… but once killed, didn’t women drape themselves in the fox’s beautiful GINGER fur?  So it was because they liked to eat the Lord’s pheasants that they were hated, not because they were red.

There you have the totally unscientific results of my red heads in nature query. My conclusion?  People who hate or discriminate against red headed people simply because of their hair color are insane.

Obviously, more testing is needed before I publish my report in the Journal Scientific.

Nature’s Ginger Babies

by j9pers on February 24, 2010 · 0 comments

As I was sorting through photos I’ve taken over the past year, I started noticing a trend.  Not only do I tend to find red heads great subjects for photos, I tend to take a lot of shots of other gingers.  “Nature’s gingers,” if you will.  Looking at these other forms of gingers, made me wonder:  Is there discrimination against gingers of other species like there is against human gingers in some parts of the world?  Are they looked down upon or thought of as inferior in some way purely based on the color of their hair/fur/plumage?  In an effort to get to the bottom of this question, here is a quick and completely unscientific look at red heads in nature.

Let’s start with the bird world.  Surely, there’s some discrimination against red heads there.

Here’s the Cardinal.

Cardinal

Nope. One of the most beloved birds in North America.  BECAUSE of it’s gorgeous red plumage.

The Woodpecker perhaps?

Red headed woodpecker

They did make a cartoon about this bird.  Woody Woodpecker.  But he was one of the most popular cartoon characters in history. Woody’s even got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

The Redhead duck?

Redhead duck

Nope. There is a brand of highly trusted, top quality sports gear named after this one.  The founders wouldn’t have bet their image on a mascot that was inferior and loathed.

Surely the parrot?

by Stoichiometry

Wait… Isn’t Jimmy Buffett’s entire empire built on his beloved and proud “Parrot Heads?” Aren’t these beautiful Macaws one of the most intelligent and most valuable birds in the world?

Ah, but humans are mammals, so this must be a mammal issue.

This is a Golden Lion Tamarin.

Ginger Snap Photography

(Gosh, I wish this hair color came in a bottle!)  They are originally from Brazil and an endangered species.  According to Wikipedia, there are several conservation programs attempting to save this species.  Hmmm.  Wonder what the ginger-haters think of that?

Another ginger primate is this guy.

Ginger Snap Photography

I’m not sure what breed he is, but frankly – red hair or not – he can do whatever he wants.

The Irish Setter?

Irish Setter

Considered to be one of the most beautiful dogs ever bred (because of his gorgeous GINGER coat, I might add.) Did you see the Disney movie, “Big Red?”  Don’t see any ginger hatred here, do you?

Okay, let’s go to the infamous red fox.

Red Fox

They were hunted and hated, right? Um… but once killed, didn’t women drape themselves in the fox’s beautiful GINGER fur?  So it was because they liked to eat the Lord’s pheasants that they were hated, not because they were red.

There you have the totally unscientific results of my red heads in nature query. My conclusion?  People who hate or discriminate against red headed people simply because of their hair color are insane.

Obviously, more testing is needed before I publish my report in the Journal Scientific.

Nature’s Ginger Babies

by j9pers on February 24, 2010 · 0 comments

As I was sorting through photos I’ve taken over the past year, I started noticing a trend.  Not only do I tend to find red heads great subjects for photos, I tend to take a lot of shots of other gingers.  “Nature’s gingers,” if you will.  Looking at these other forms of gingers, made me wonder:  Is there discrimination against gingers of other species like there is against human gingers in some parts of the world?  Are they looked down upon or thought of as inferior in some way purely based on the color of their hair/fur/plumage?  In an effort to get to the bottom of this question, here is a quick and completely unscientific look at red heads in nature.

Let’s start with the bird world.  Surely, there’s some discrimination against red heads there.

Here’s the Cardinal.

Cardinal

Nope. One of the most beloved birds in North America.  BECAUSE of it’s gorgeous red plumage.

The Woodpecker perhaps?

Red headed woodpecker

They did make a cartoon about this bird.  Woody Woodpecker.  But he was one of the most popular cartoon characters in history. Woody’s even got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

The Redhead duck?

Redhead duck

Nope. There is a brand of highly trusted, top quality sports gear named after this one.  The founders wouldn’t have bet their image on a mascot that was inferior and loathed.

Surely the parrot?

by Stoichiometry

Wait… Isn’t Jimmy Buffett’s entire empire built on his beloved and proud “Parrot Heads?” Aren’t these beautiful Macaws one of the most intelligent and most valuable birds in the world?

Ah, but humans are mammals, so this must be a mammal issue.

This is a Golden Lion Tamarin.

Ginger Snap Photography

(Gosh, I wish this hair color came in a bottle!)  They are originally from Brazil and an endangered species.  According to Wikipedia, there are several conservation programs attempting to save this species.  Hmmm.  Wonder what the ginger-haters think of that?

Another ginger primate is this guy.

Ginger Snap Photography

I’m not sure what breed he is, but frankly – red hair or not – he can do whatever he wants.

The Irish Setter?

Irish Setter

Considered to be one of the most beautiful dogs ever bred (because of his gorgeous GINGER coat, I might add.) Did you see the Disney movie, “Big Red?”  Don’t see any ginger hatred here, do you?

Okay, let’s go to the infamous red fox.

Red Fox

They were hunted and hated, right? Um… but once killed, didn’t women drape themselves in the fox’s beautiful GINGER fur?  So it was because they like to eat the Lord’s pheasants that they were hated, not because they were red.

There you have the totally unscientific results of my red heads in nature query. My conclusion?  People who hate or discriminate against red headed people simply because of their hair color are insane.

Obviously, more testing is needed before I publish my report in the Journal Scientific.

Nature’s Ginger Babies

by j9pers on February 24, 2010 · 0 comments

As I was sorting through photos I’ve taken over the past year, I started noticing a trend.  Not only do I tend to find red heads great subjects for photos, I tend to take a lot of shots of other gingers.  “Nature’s gingers,” if you will.  Looking at these other forms of gingers, made me wonder:  Is there discrimination against gingers of other species like there is against human gingers in some parts of the world?  Are they looked down upon or thought of as inferior in some way purely based on the color of their hair/fur/plumage?  In an effort to get to the bottom of this question, here is a quick and completely unscientific look at red heads in nature.

Let’s start with the bird world.  Surely, there’s some discrimination against red heads there.

Here’s the Cardinal.

Cardinal

Nope. One of the most beloved birds in North America.  BECAUSE of it’s gorgeous red plumage.

The Woodpecker perhaps?

Red headed woodpecker

They did make a cartoon about this bird.  Woody Woodpecker.  But he was one of the most popular cartoon characters in history. Woody’s even got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

The Redhead duck?

Redhead duck

Nope. There is a brand of highly trusted, top quality sports gear named after this one.  The founders wouldn’t have bet their image on a mascot that was inferior and loathed.

Surely the parrot?

by Stoichiometry

Wait… Isn’t Jimmy Buffett’s entire empire built on his beloved and proud “Parrot Heads?” Aren’t these beautiful Macaws one of the most intelligent and most valuable birds in the world?

Ah, but humans are mammals, so this must be a mammal issue.

This is a Golden Lion Tamarin.

Ginger Snap Photography

(Gosh, I wish this hair color came in a bottle!)  They are originally from Brazil and an endangered species.  According to Wikipedia, there are several conservation programs attempting to save this species.  Hmmm.  Wonder what the ginger-haters think of that?

Another ginger primate is this guy.

Ginger Snap Photography

I’m not sure what breed he is, but frankly – red hair or not – he can do whatever he wants.

The Irish Setter?

Irish Setter

Considered to be one of the most beautiful dogs ever bred (because of his gorgeous GINGER coat, I might add.) Did you see the Disney movie, “Big Red?”  Don’t see any ginger hatred here, do you?

Okay, let’s go to the infamous red fox.

Red Fox

They were hunted and hated, right? Um… but once killed, didn’t women drape themselves in the fox’s beautiful GINGER fur?  So it was because they like to eat the Lord’s pheasants that they were hated, not because they were red.

There you have the totally unscientific results of my red heads in nature query. My conclusion?  People who hate or discriminate against red headed people simply because of their hair color are insane.

Obviously, more testing is needed before I publish my report in the Journal Scientific.

Nature’s Ginger Babies

by j9pers on February 24, 2010 · 0 comments

As I was sorting through photos I’ve taken over the past year, I started noticing a trend.  Not only do I tend to find red heads great subjects for photos, I tend to take a lot of shots of other gingers.  “Nature’s gingers,” if you will.  Looking at these other forms of gingers, made me wonder:  Is there discrimination against gingers of other species like there is against human gingers in some parts of the world?  Are they looked down upon or thought of as inferior in some way purely based on the color of their hair/fur/plumage?  In an effort to get to the bottom of this question, here is a quick and completely unscientific look at red heads in nature.

Let’s start with the bird world.  Surely, there’s some discrimination against red heads there.

Here’s the Cardinal.

Cardinal

Nope. One of the most beloved birds in North America.  BECAUSE of it’s gorgeous red plumage.

The Woodpecker perhaps?

Red headed woodpecker

They did make a cartoon about this bird.  Woody Woodpecker.  But he was one of the most popular cartoon characters in history. Woody’s even got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

The Redhead duck?

Redhead duck

Nope. There is a brand of highly trusted, top quality sports gear named after this one.  The founders wouldn’t have bet their image on a mascot that was inferior and loathed.

Surely the parrot?

by Stoichiometry

Wait… Isn’t Jimmy Buffett’s entire empire built on his beloved and proud “Parrot Heads?” Aren’t these beautiful Macaws one of the most intelligent and most valuable birds in the world?

Ah, but humans are mammals, so this must be a mammal issue.

This is a Golden Lion Tamarin.

Ginger Snap Photography

(Gosh, I wish this hair color came in a bottle!)  They are originally from Brazil and an endangered species.  According to Wikipedia, there are several conservation programs attempting to save this species.  Hmmm.  Wonder what the ginger-haters think of that?

Another ginger primate is this guy.

Ginger Snap Photography

I’m not sure what breed he is, but frankly – red hair or not – he can do whatever he wants.

The Irish Setter?

Irish Setter

Considered to be one of the most beautiful dogs ever bred (because of his gorgeous GINGER coat, I might add)? Disney movie, “Big Red?”  Don’t see any ginger hatred here, do you?

Okay, let’s go to the infamous red fox.

Red Fox

They were hunted and hated, right? Um… but once killed, didn’t women drape themselves in the fox’s beautiful GINGER fur?  So it was because they like to eat the Lord’s pheasants that they were hated, not because they were red.

There you have the totally unscientific results of my red heads in nature query. My conclusion?  People who hate or discriminate against red headed people simply because of their hair color are insane.

Obviously, more testing is needed before I publish my report in the Journal Scientific.